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  • Boman Irani talks movies
    Great actors have one thing in common. They can get inside the skin of the character to such an extent that it's impossible to distinguish them from the character they're playing.  Boman Irani is definitely one such actor. From the stern principal of a medical college in Munnabhai MBBS to the neurotic college director Prof Sahasrabudhhe. His ability to convey an entire horizon of emotions through his expressions and body language have put him into a league of his own. His latest stint as a middle-aged cynical Parsi father in 'Ferrari Ki Sawaari' lives up to his brand. We got the man himself, Boman Irani, to come and visit the Yahoo! India office where he chatted with Kunal Guha about his mantra for acting and what he looks for in films before deciding to feature in them. Here's a transcript of the chat.

    What excited you about the film and your character when you first heard a narration of 'Ferrari Ki Sawaari'?
    Honestly, I was cast even before the narration. Mapuskar (Director Rajesh

    Read More »from ‘I love my wife more than my car’
  • Ferrari Ki SawaariRajesh Mapuskar's "Ferrari Ki Sawaari" is a well-intentioned film but it tries too hard to strike an emotional chord. While an interesting plot and some fine writing could have made this film stand-out but a light-hearted film infused with too much sentimentality spoils the fun.

    Rusy's (Sharman Joshi) son is a gifted 12-year-old who is a young aspiring cricketer. Despite limited means Rusy wants to do the best for his son. The little boy gets a chance to go to Lords for a cricketing camp and Rusy has to somehow arrange for a big sum of money to make his dream come true. In comes a local politician who wants Sachin Tendulkars's Ferrari on loan for his son's wedding. Rusy becomes the connection between the Ferrari, Sachin Tendulkar and the money that the groom's father is ready to shell out for the 'Ferrari ki sawaari'. The honest and upright Rusy succumbs to pressure and tries to make quick money to pay for the camp but the simple plan obviously goes all wrong.

    Sharman Joshi and Boman

    Read More »from Review: Ferrari Ki Sawaari
  • Scooter Ki Sawaari

    Cast: Sharman Joshi, Boman Irani, Ritvik Sahore

    Directed by Rajesh Mapuskar

    Rating: **1/2

    Films like these are rare. If you evaluate ‘Ferrari Ki Sawaari’ with the usual metrics set for comedies, it lacks everything that would get a film distributer to bounce his belly or seduce an audience member to shell a chunk of his weekend budget on a multiplex ticket. No Bollywood A-listers, no comedy of errors where people get seriously injured, double meaning jokes- absent. And it doesn’t even have a story that’s compelling enough when you narrate it. But if this film does craft anything with delicious enthusiasm, it has to be the amiable characters that manage to hassle you with their problems and allow you to relish their joys as if they were your own.

    The film takes us into the unremarkable life of this Parsi family comprising three generations of men. Grandpa Deboo or Mota baba (Boman Irani) is grumpier than the average grumpy person of his age and is perpetually plopped in front of the

    Read More »from Ferrari Ki Sawaari review
  • The Amazing Spiderman

    One of the world's most beloved characters is back on the big screen as a new chapter in the Spider-Man legacy is revealed in 'The Amazing Spider-Man'.  Focusing on an untold story that tells a different side of the Peter Parker story, the new film stars Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans, Denis Leary, Campbell Scott, Irrfan Khan, with Martin Sheen and Sally Field.  The film is directed by Marc Webb.  Screenplay by James Vanderbilt and Alvin Sargent and Steve Kloves.  The film will open in theaters everywhere in 3D on June 29, 2012. So here are a few production secrets behind this mammoth blockbuster that you surely didn't know.


    The film’s exteriors were largely shot on the New York street sets at Universal Studios as the first film to shoot there following the set’s extensive rebuild following a devastating fire in 2008.  “Luckily, the set became available for us to use for several weeks of filming at just the right time,” says executive producer Michael Grillo. “Our production Read More »from 10 secrets about the new Spiderman
  • Movie Stills: ShanghaiDibakar Banerjee's 'Shanghai' is an intense political thriller that has a tight script and commendable acting holding the plot together all along. Banerjee's plots are rooted in reality and this one explores the issue of illegal land acquisition.

    An upcoming International Business Park (IBP) holds the promise of transforming a small Indian town into Shanghai. On the eve of its launch, a social activist Dr Ahmedi (Prosenjit Chatterjee), who is protesting illegal land acquisition by the multi-national company, is killed by a speeding truck. The professor's adherents believe that this was a political conspiracy, devised and executed by the state's ruling party.

    Was it an accident or a premeditated murder attempt? Shalini Pearson Sahay (Kalki Kochelin) fights a lone battle to unravel the murder mystery and seeks the help of a shady porn filmmaker Jogi (Emraan Hashmi). A high-ranking bureaucrat, T.A. Krishnan (Abhay Deol) is brought in to investigate the case but the ministry doesn't really

    Read More »from Yahoo! Movies Review: Shanghai
  • The Picture Box

    Outside, it was cloudy. The child in the window-frame gazed on, wonder-struck, relishing the summer drizzle. Leaves and droplets were all he saw. This helped him scribble down his maiden two-liner. Starting out that day as a seven year old, he found himself on a trip leading him, years later, to the first Indian Nobel Prize. (It's 'stolen' by now!)

    Interestingly, the iconic "jol porey, paata norey.." of our toddler days, had another line (authorship un-specified) attached to it. Rhymed together it became : "Jol porey, pata norey / pagla haati-r matha norey" and stayed on. Sounds innocent, but it's really tough to translate. Still, an attempt...

    Pitter-patter, on shivering leaves,                                                                                                                                                                                              The mad elephant keeps nodding it's head...                                    

    Cut to > Classroom

    Cine-Studies, @JU,

    Read More »from The Picture Box
  • Rowdy RathoreWhile we might complain about the lack of originality, 'Rowdy Rathore' has already set the cash registers ringing. Prabhudheva seems to have mastered the art of remaking Southern super-hit films for Bollywood without the slightest attempt at novelty.

    Anupama Chopra says that the film is a "relentless assault":

    Don't Angry Me! Akshay Kumar bellows this often in Rowdy Rathore. At one point, the command even plays out as background music. I think viewers need to co-opt the line. To all the directors, producers, actors who are inflicting eighties-style, low-IQ, deafeningly loud, unapologetically crass, mind-numbing movies on us, I just want to say: Don't angry me! Don't exhaust me! Don't bludgeon me!

    Raja Sen says that 'Rowdy Rathore' may be "moronically stupid and entirely pointless" but is far less objectionable:

    We've seen it all before and apparently going by the numbers generated by Ghajini, Wanted, Dabangg, Bodyguard, Ready and Singham -- that's what we want. A good meaty chunk of

    Read More »from Y! Meta Review: Rowdy Rathore
  • Prabhudheva's 'Rowdy Rathore' is a typical masala film, packed with romance, drama, melodrama and lots of action. The film is loaded with Tamil-style punch lines, slow motion action sequences where blood quietly trickles on to dusty ground and menacing-looking villains who live in a Ramgarh-styled (remember, Sholay) haunt.

    The protagonist is a smart small time conman who is ready to mend his ways when he falls in love. Just when he is ready to turn over a new leaf, he runs into a small girl who thinks he is her father and some goons who are people vying for his blood. A few chases and some confusion later, we realize that Shiva (our conman) has been mistaken for Vikram Singh Rathore, an upright and courageous police officer.

    Video: Lehren

    Prabhudheva manages to blend the many ingredients that can spice-up this potpourri. However, too much time is spent on the back story. We would much rather see more of Rowdy Rathore than a long tragic flashback.

    Akshay Kumar in a double role returns

    Read More »from Yahoo! Movies Review: Rowdy Rathore

  • The united colours of Saif Ali Khan
    While A K Hangal would beg to differ, no actor would want to be typecast in Bollywood. Most may argue that it limits their creative potential to perform varied roles, it actually means that it restricts them to only a few films. But for some, holding on to a forced image is the only way to go. And the trailer of ‘Cocktail’ suggests that Saif Ali Khan is one such person. He may be branded as nasty Nawab in real life but on the big screen he has been canned as a ‘boy-next-door’ who’s always up for some good ol’ slam-bam-thank-you-maam. And this is a character hasn’t evolved much over time. From ‘Dil Chahta Hai’ to ‘Hum Tum’ to ‘Love Aaj Kal’, Saif has mastered the commitment-phobic young adult and his rehearsed goofiness ensures box office dhamakas.  So why exactly should he grow up and grow out of this typecast? Here are reasons why Saif should stick to playing the same role in every film?

    The commitment phobic

    Saif in 'Kal Ho Na Ho'
    Saif’s fans (most of them atleast) love him for the adorable indecisive
    Read More »from Why Saif Ali Khan should never grow up
  • Department

    Cast: Amitabh Bachchan, Sanjay Dutt, Rana Daggubati, Madhu Shalini, Lakshmi Manchu, Nathalia Kaur

    Directed by Ram Gopal Varma

    Rating: Minus One

    RGV worshippers ready to throng multiplexes to catch this tickling thriller must be equally prepared to feature in an upcoming episode of ‘Satyamev Jayate’. This is because the ace filmmaker’s camera angles could leave them spooned, smooched, thumped to the ground and splashed under a water cooler. Infact RGV’s decidedly jerky camera takes us where no man, woman or Jadoo has ever been. From inside tea cups to the labyrinths of nostrils, from being tossed around as the striker on a carom board to being flung across the beach as a ball (this one gets you clinically dizzy). But in most cases, you end up on the floor pretty close to where your dignity is for picking this film. Abused? Yes. Amused? Unintentionally. Fist? Clenched.
     
    The movie begins with the following prophetic words, ‘Power corrupts’. And while you mull over these two words

    Read More »from Department review

Pagination

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