'Bollywood has wonderful actors'


So how does one keep the soul of a film intact in a remake, considering that the original is being made in a milieu that cannot be transplanted? “It has a distinct effect in production,” he says, speaking with the knowledge of one who has also donned the producer’s hat and even won a national award in that role (Vanaprastham, directed by Shaji N Karun). “When you’re shooting a song sequence for a Malayalam film, you have to understand what the Kerala audience would like. But when you’re doing an international film, you have to sacrifice a lot of things, since there are many norms that determine the success of each kind of film. So when a Malayalam film is remade in Tamil with say Rajnikanth, there would be song and fight sequences that go with his kind of films, since that is what the audience would want. Hindi films and even Tamil films are made for international market. Malayalam films have a fairly smaller market. At the most, it might be marketed in the Middle-East, US and Europe. The important thing is that every film has a soul and conveys something.”
 
That brings us back to Mohanlal’s non-presence in Bollywood, especially given that so many south Indian stars make no bones about their craving for the big break in B Town. “I am not a newcomer,” he says, reacting to the suggestion that he might need a ‘break’. “I’ve been working for the last 35 years. I don’t need to prove anything by working in Hindi films. I am very content with the work I am doing and happy in my own language. If I get a very good irresistible role, I would surely want to do it. Many actresses who’re newcomers start off in Malayalam or Tamil films and try to prove themselves there since they get a good reach, and then try to score in-roads into Hindi films. For actors like me, just working in a film like ‘Company’ is enough. If I have to do another film, it has to be better than 'Company'.”


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