Karva Chauth, Yash Chopra and Hindi cinema

By Enkayaar, Glamsham Editorial

Yash Chopra was the quintessential Punjabi and through his cinema was able to introduce and popularize where elements of Punjabi culture to such an extent that they became an object worth emulation at the national level. The festival of Karva Chauth which is now celebrated all over the country, came to acquire the festival of a national stature thanks to Yash Chopra who used it as a template of affirmation of romance eventually culminating into nuptial tie up in an innovative manner through his cult film DILWALE DULHANIA LE JAYENGE.

DDLJ started the trend of couples observing fast for each other after watching the film as for them expression of love for each other could not be done in a much better manner than through observing fast on Karva Chauth. At the surface level, this template was used for expression of romance for each other by the couples, but there was a profound message associated with it as well, a message of empowerment for the ladies.

As a matter of convention most of the fasts and rituals that are observed in the country have to be predominantly done by the female but through DDLJ. Yash Chopra drove home the point that if a female is observing fast for the betterment and well-being of her lover or the husband, it should be incumbent upon the male of the variety to reciprocate the same as well.

Karva Chauth, as a festival was used as a template of devotion by the wives for their husbands in Dasari Narayan Rao's film MAANG BHARO SAJNA, but as it affirmed the stereotype notion, it could not catch the fancy of the film viewing public, and after Yash Chopra deconstructed it, it became an occasion to be celebrated all over the country. After all, he injected romanticism into it in his own inimitable manner.

Today when this festival is being celebrated and observed all over the country Yash Chopra would be content that he could create a template that is now a practice all over India, underlining the unity in diversity for which India has been famous, and a template that cinema continues to strive for and aspire to. Yash Chopra could take it to such levels as he never focused the processes associated with it in detail, rather he shot it through and through with romanticism, and he again affirmed his belief in romance associated with Karva Chauth when he used the template with sagacity in VEER-ZAARA.

More such directors indeed are required to inject an element of romance into our festivities so that the traditions associated with it could be set aside and the spirit of the festivities gain prominence. Once it starts happening in a big way, the experimentation of Yash Chopra would really have borne fruit.

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