Tolkien's 'The One Ring' may have been inspired by cursed Roman band

Washington, Apr. 3 (ANI): A Roman ring that is believed to have inspired JRR Tolkien's 'The One Ring' has been put on display by Britain's National Trust and the Tolkien Society

The ring, which was found in a field near a historic Roman town in southern England in 1785, is inscribed in Latin, "Senicianus live well in God," and inset with an image of the goddess Venus, Fox News reported.

The ring is larger than average, weighs 12 grams, and is believed to date from the 4th century.

It is also believed to be linked to a curse tablet that was found separately at the site of a Roman temple dedicated to a god named Nodens in Gloucestershire, western England.

The tablet says a man called Silvianus lost a ring, and it asks Nodens to place a curse of ill health on Senicianus until he returned it back to the temple.

An archaeologist who had looked into the connection between the ring and the curse tablet had asked Tolkien, who was an Anglo-Saxon professor at Oxford University, to work on the etymology of the name Nodens in 1929.

The 'Lord of the Rings' author also visited the temple several times, and some people believe that he may have been aware of the Roman ring's existence before he wrote "The Hobbit."

Lynn Forest-Hill, education officer for the Tolkien Society, said that the influences most often cited for Tolkien's creation of 'The One Ring' usually take the form of literary or legendary rings.

She added that it is, then, particularly fascinating to see the physical evidence of the [ring], with its links to Tolkien through the inscription associating it with a curse.

The gold ring has been displayed at The Vyne, a historic mansion in southern England. (ANI)